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Elijah and the Widow of Zarephath

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Open Access

Elijah and the Widow of Zarephath

Artist: Jan Snellinck (1544 or 1549 - 1638) Primary
Artist: Gerard de Jode (1509 or 1517 - 1591) Printer
Date: 1585
16th century
Dimensions: 8.03 x 11.26 in. (20.4 x 28.6 cm)
Dimensions Extent: image
Object Type: Print
Creation Place: Europe, Belgium, Flanders
Medium and Support: Engraving on paper
Credit Line: Gift of James M. Reed, 2017.
Accession Number: 2017.35.821
This work is not currently on view


The story comes from 1 Kings Chapter 17. Beneath the image, the Latin text reads "Tecta Sareptanae divine propheta veas ti Thesbita, viduae dum furit atra fames."




Keywords

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engraving
The intaglio process in which the design is incised into a printing plate, usually a flat copper plate, with the aid of a graver or burin that is held in the palm of the hand and pushed against the copper to cut lines comprising V-shaped grooves. The plate is then inked up, wiped so that ink is retained in the grooves and then forced out under the pressure of the printing process to create lines on the paper. The technique was first developed in the early 15th century in Germany, probably by goldsmiths who wished to keep records of the designs they had engraved on their wares. The process is distinct from "wood engraving (process)," which is a process for relief printing; "wood cut (process)" refers to engraving wood blocks for printing. Historically, "engraving" has sometimes been used incorrectly to refer to all printmaking processes, particulalry any process employing printing plates. For the single step of incising an inscription or design into any surface, not only a printing plate, see "engraving (incising)."
Bibles
Refers to books, scrolls, rolls, or other document forms containing the sacred scriptures of Judaism or Christianity. Bibles may also contain illuminations, which are painted scenes or decorations. The Bible is composed of two parts: The Hebrew scriptures or Old Testament, written originally in Hebrew (with some parts in Aramaic) and including the writings of the Jewish people, and the New Testament, composed in Greek and recording the story of Jesus and the beginnings of Christianity. The Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox versions of the Old Testament are somewhat larger than the Protestant Bible because they accept certain books and parts of books considered apocryphal by Protestants. The Jewish Bible includes only the books known to Christians as the Old Testament. The arrangements of the Jewish and Christian canons differ considerably. Traditionally the Jews have divided their scriptures (the Old Testament) into three parts: The Torah (the "Law"), or Pentateuch; the Nevi'im (the "Prophets"); and the Ketuvim (the "Writings"), or Hagiographa. The stories, moral teachings, and theological doctrines in the bible have provided subjects for an immense body of visual art in both Christian and Jewish imagery. For Christians, a canon of biblical books was established in the Early Christian period; however, several apocryphal books continued to circulate long afterwards. Beginning in the late medieval period, poetic and dramatic interpretations of biblical narratives were very popular, providing ample extra-canonical literature that contributed to the development of important subjects in Christian art.
prints
Pictorial works produced by transferring images by means of a matrix such as a plate, block, or screen, using any of various printing processes. When emphasizing the individual printed image, use "impressions." Avoid the controversial expression "original prints," except in reference to discussions of the expression's use. If prints are neither "reproductive prints" nor "popular prints," use the simple term "prints." With regard to photographs, prefer "photographic prints"; for types of reproductions of technical drawings and documents, see terms found under "reprographic copies."
biblical
Of, relating to, or contained in the Bible, which contains the sacred scriptures of Judaism or Christianity.
Bible stories
Stories paraphrasing Biblical texts or closely based on Biblical events.
public domain
Land owned and controlled by the state or federal government. Also, the status of publications, products, and processes that are not protected under patent or copyright.
sixteenth century
Century in the proleptic Gregorian calendar including the years 1500 to 1599 (or 1501 to 1600).

Portfolio List

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