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Approaching Storm/Jamaica (White)

Artist: Nashormeh Lindo (July 29 1953 – )
Artist: Robert Franklin (aka "Bob") Printer
Artist: Publisher
Date: 2009
21st
Dimensions: 29 5/8 x 22 in. (752.48 x 558.8 mm)
Dimensions Extent: sheet
Object Type: Print
Creation Place: North America, United States
Medium and Support: Offset Lithograph on paper
Edition Size: 16
Credit Line: Partial gift of the Brandywine Workshop and Museum Purchase with funds from the Black Art Fund, 2022.
Accession Number: 2022.17.26
This work is not currently on view


"This print is a composite of two photographs I took in Jamaica in 2006. We were returning from the south coast of the island, a town called Treasure Beach, when we passed a woman who was leaving church, on the way to work. The sun was shining but in the distance we could see a storm approaching. The other photo was taken at dusk. There was a full moon rising over a tiny fishing village near Calabash Bay. I merged the two photos and altered the color tonalities. The resulting image, merging these two scenes from that trip, is the basis for my print image—Approaching Storm, Jamaica."
—From Brandywine Workshop and Archives records

To learn more about this work, see it on Artura.org , an open educational resource from the Brandywine Workshop and Archives.




Keywords

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Black Art Fund
FUAM's Black Art Fund is a fundraising initiative to support the acquisition of artwork by contemporary Black artists, to address a major gap in the museum’s permanent collection. The museum is accepts both financial contributions to this fund to be used for purchases of artwork as well as donations of museum quality artworks to achieve greater representation and recognition of non-white artists and artworks.
prints
Pictorial works produced by transferring images by means of a matrix such as a plate, block, or screen, using any of various printing processes. When emphasizing the individual printed image, use "impressions." Avoid the controversial expression "original prints," except in reference to discussions of the expression's use. If prints are neither "reproductive prints" nor "popular prints," use the simple term "prints." With regard to photographs, prefer "photographic prints"; for types of reproductions of technical drawings and documents, see terms found under "reprographic copies."
abstract
Genre of visual arts in which figurative subjects or other forms are simplified or changed in their representation so that they do not portray a recognizable person, object, thing, etc.; may reference an idea, quality, or state rather than a concrete object. For the process of formulating general concepts by abstracting common properties of instances, prefer "abstraction." For 20th-century art styles that were a reaction against the traditional European conception of art as the imitation of nature, use "Abstract (fine arts style)."

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