FILTER RESULTS × Close
Skip to Content ☰ Open Filter >>

Object Results

Showing 20 of 47




This image may be copyright protected.

Goodly Are Your Tents

Artist: Suzanne Benton Primary
Date: 1994
20th century
Dimensions: 13 x 9 7/8 in. (330.2 x 250.83 mm)
Object Type: Print
Creation Place: North America, United States
Medium and Support: Monoprint with Chine collé
Credit Line: Gift of Suzanne Benton, 2022.
Accession Number: 2022.27.02
This work is not currently on view


The title of this work is a reference to the Mah Tovu , a prayer in Judaism expressing to reverance or respect when entering houses of worship. The text of the prayer is taken from a variety of passages, beginning with Numbers 24:5: "מַה-טֹּבוּ אֹהָלֶיךָ, יַעֲקֹב; מִשְׁכְּנֹתֶיךָ, יִשְׂרָאֵל" or "How goodly are thy tents, O Jacob, thy dwellings, O Israel!"




Keywords

Click a term to view other artwork with the same keyword

Bibles
Refers to books, scrolls, rolls, or other document forms containing the sacred scriptures of Judaism or Christianity. Bibles may also contain illuminations, which are painted scenes or decorations. The Bible is composed of two parts: The Hebrew scriptures or Old Testament, written originally in Hebrew (with some parts in Aramaic) and including the writings of the Jewish people, and the New Testament, composed in Greek and recording the story of Jesus and the beginnings of Christianity. The Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox versions of the Old Testament are somewhat larger than the Protestant Bible because they accept certain books and parts of books considered apocryphal by Protestants. The Jewish Bible includes only the books known to Christians as the Old Testament. The arrangements of the Jewish and Christian canons differ considerably. Traditionally the Jews have divided their scriptures (the Old Testament) into three parts: The Torah (the "Law"), or Pentateuch; the Nevi'im (the "Prophets"); and the Ketuvim (the "Writings"), or Hagiographa. The stories, moral teachings, and theological doctrines in the bible have provided subjects for an immense body of visual art in both Christian and Jewish imagery. For Christians, a canon of biblical books was established in the Early Christian period; however, several apocryphal books continued to circulate long afterwards. Beginning in the late medieval period, poetic and dramatic interpretations of biblical narratives were very popular, providing ample extra-canonical literature that contributed to the development of important subjects in Christian art.
prints
Pictorial works produced by transferring images by means of a matrix such as a plate, block, or screen, using any of various printing processes. When emphasizing the individual printed image, use "impressions." Avoid the controversial expression "original prints," except in reference to discussions of the expression's use. If prints are neither "reproductive prints" nor "popular prints," use the simple term "prints." With regard to photographs, prefer "photographic prints"; for types of reproductions of technical drawings and documents, see terms found under "reprographic copies."
biblical
Of, relating to, or contained in the Bible, which contains the sacred scriptures of Judaism or Christianity.
Bible stories
Stories paraphrasing Biblical texts or closely based on Biblical events.

Portfolio List

This object is a member of the following portfolios:


Does this record contain inaccurate information or language that you feel we should improve? Please contact the museum registrar at mpaqua@fairfield.edu.